Mesh Removal Question

Hernia Discussion Forums Hernia Discussion Mesh Removal Question

Viewing 10 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #30557
      Chuck
      Participant

      To those of you who had mesh removed….did the removal process bring new symptoms? ie …I have urinary symptoms that cant be 100 percent nailed down to the mesh….but i dont want this plastic junk in me anyway for the next 20 years….in the absence of clear problems does anyone who had had mesh removed beielve that mesh should be taken our proactively?? i know i have asked this before and some have answered…but hoping others will weigh in….

    • #30558
      Good intentions
      Participant

      It’s an individual decision. There is no way to predict what the mesh will do or how you will feel with it. Some people never feel comfortable with it, others suffer a slow degradation of function and increasing pain (my situation), some report that they are happy with it until, for some reason, they start experiencing pain 5, 10, 15 years later.

      On top of that, there are so many different types of mesh and ways to create the space to implant it in, and ways to secure it, that there is no such thing as just “mesh”. It really is the best defense for any maker or user of mesh – too complicated to determine who or what is right and who or what is wrong. Just keep doing what you learned to do, right or wrong. Nobody knows.

      Dr. Towfigh will be talking about “mesh” on the 15th but I would bet that the word will be used to describe any and all types of mesh and implantation procedures. Dr. Heniford was a big proponent of creating a mesh registry just a few years ago, but as far as I know his words were wasted. He is part of an effort to create better survey questions to determine how patients do with mesh, the Carolinas Comfort Scale, but even with his noble goals, I don’t think that any type of mesh or procedure will be called out as “bad”. It’s just not done, the strongest words against a mesh product that I have seen is a simple tweet that said “plugs are evil”. There will be much talk but at the end but any listeners will probably realize that nothing has changed and that the purpose of the discussion is to make people feel better about mesh. Not to improve the odds of a successful long-term hernia repair. There will be little useful information for any people suffering from mesh or planning a hernia repair. I hope that I am wrong and that Dr. Heniford has progress to report, maybe even participating in getting bad products or procedures spot-lighted so that people can avoid them. But the time that has passed does not really offer any reason for hope.

      I am soap-boxing again, but it is fascinating to watch. I keep hoping that somebody will step up, like Dr. Bandavid of the Shouldice Hospital did. Dr. Heniford made an effort but has faded away.

      Keep asking questions and talking and eventually a path will become clear.

      If you could describe your problems in more detail, people will be able to say “that happened to me” or “I didn’t have that”. I have written about my problems in graphic specific detail. I can say that, generally, my bowel functions improved considerably after mesh removal. More normal and regular.

    • #30561
      Chuck
      Participant

      Good intentions…thanks so much for your responses…is there anyway i can consult with you by phone regarding your removal experience? happy to pay pal you for your time. I have great remorse about implanting this mesh and am thinking that maybe i should remove it proactively to prevent it from wrapping nerves or crashing through the bladder or the intestine etc…never mind all the plastic degradation that will continue to hit my immune system…etc…I simply cant comprehend how i agreed to implantation…i think i was trying to avoid having two incisions on either side of the groin by doing lap surgery. Dr B told me he can remove the mesh…but no promises about then outcome…if he can remove it and i get no worse thats good enough for me…but you know more about the effects removal has on the body. If these are simply too significant, then maybe its not worth it…long operation under general anesthesia…tissue trauma etc may not be worth it…but you would know better as the expert on this issue…if you can spare a few minutes to chat let me know,

    • #30563
      Good intentions
      Participant

      I do not claim to be an expert on the subject. I just recount my own experience and what I’ve learned over the years.

      I don’t think that anything is going to happen suddenly. No crashing in to things inside your body. From what I’ve read of other people’s experiences and from my own, a simple awareness of how your life is changing is what drives people to make the decision. I had very little to lose, my life was on a steady decline because of the physical effects of the mesh. ajm22 might have taken a bigger risk, since he had persistent discomfort but, as I recall, was physically fully functional. Steady and even physically, just not comfortable with the mesh. Other members had excruciating pain that they lived with for years until they found a surgeon who would remove the mesh.

      If you are feeling the mesh in your body now you will very likely not feel it anymore after explantation. If you get a good surgeon who knows the human anatomy and how to perform surgery you will probably be no worse than you are now, but might not get the improvement you’re hoping for.

      I don’t have much more to offer by voice, sorry. There is much good information on this forum. As I’ve said, nothing has really changed. Your problem today is the same as the person who had it ten or fifteen years ago.

    • #30564
      William Bryant
      Participant

      What did Dr Bandavid day, good intentions?

    • #30567
      Good intentions
      Participant

      I misspelled his name, it is Bendavid. He was a surgeon at the Shouldice Hospital who was very vocal about the problems with mesh. Unfortunately, I think that he tended to make people defensive and he probably offended also. This tends to lock people in to their views, whether they are right or wrong.

      Here a few examples of his work, before he died.

      https://file.scirp.org/pdf/IJCM_2014071513232526.pdf

      https://file.scirp.org/pdf/IJCM_2014072117033945.pdf

    • #30568
      Good intentions
      Participant
    • #30570
      SpringsMan
      Participant

      Dr.Krpata runs a groin pain clinic at Cleveland Clinic. I wonder what his success rate is? Multi disciplinary approach and from his interview with Dr. Towfigh most patients have surgery. The website mentions neurectomy, not sure if that is good or necessary with mesh removal.

      Also Dr. Levi Proctor in Richmond, VA has been mentioned here for groin pain and mesh removal.

    • #30644
      Good intentions
      Participant

      Here are some things that might help your research. The SAGES video is very poor, it has audio after the visual stops. The articles are “pay-per-view” (of course) but might be worth looking up at your local university.

      https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10029-018-1839-4

      https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00464-018-6558-5

    • #30645
      Good intentions
      Participant

      Vidoes.

      No obvious reason for pain.

    • #30646
      Good intentions
      Participant

      This video is a bit confusing at the start because Dr. Towfigh is a co-author and it says that chronic pain occurs in 6-12% of hernia repairs. The chronic pain from mesh numbers quoted today are lower for some reason. But the presentation does not break them down by type, so it’s unclear if pure tissue is included in the number. The references are probably in the associated paper. The video is about mesh removal though, but also shows implantation of what looks like Ovitex absorbable mesh afterward. It does show what is left behind after mesh removal so worth watching for those considering removal. All of that cauterized tissue has to rebond and heal, and the remnants need to be cleared out by the body during the healing process.

      So they took synthetic mesh out and replaced it with absorbable mesh. Not clear how the patient is doing today. The video is from July 1, 2018.

      It looks like the video associated with the paper.

      https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00464-018-6558-5

Viewing 10 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

New Report

Close

Skip to toolbar