Getting a lot of negative reports re Yunis lately

Hernia Discussion Forums Hernia Discussion Getting a lot of negative reports re Yunis lately

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    • #33516
      Chuck
      Participant

      Folks..about 5 people have reached out to me over the last several weeks to tell me they received very poor treatment from Dr. Yunis. To be fair…my experience was good…and Peter C reports the same. These folks were people with difficult removal issues so take that into consideration…but the reports struck me as heartless…refusing to take phone calls after doing a mesh surgery…telling the patient he was asking too many questions. Snapping at someone saying oh are you a surgeon now….that kind of thing. I say this because I want people to get good info off this great forum…and we often hear that Yunis did a great job…And if course I trust my brothers on this forum over any fool doctor. The more I study this, the more I think you need to go overseas for hernia care…My top picks would be Dr. Kang…Followed by Andreas Koch…..if someone stole my passport and said you gotta stay in the US—i would probably still go to Yunis. But buyer beware he is not all wine and roses…and apparently has a temper. His receptionist is also very short and unhelpful though his personal assistant melanie is nice.

    • #33522
      Watchful
      Participant

      I talked to him more than a year ago. He was pleasant, and even humble enough to say that the best place to go for a Shouldice procedure is the Shouldice Hospital, even though he was able and willing to do it. Also, he said that tissue repair would be his preference on a “virgin abdomen”, so he definitely had a favorable view of tissue repair. I ended up not going to him because of a number of reasons: he himself thought it would be better to go to Shouldice, he hadn’t done a very large number of these, I wasn’t sure if he would end up doing Shouldice or Desarda or even mesh, and I didn’t get a clear understanding of what he was doing for anesthesia. I don’t know if he changed or not since then.

      People and organizations can and do change, of course. Also, on-line reviews can be misleading because many patients prefer not to leave bad reviews. I remember that Dr. Brown used to be considered good to deal with, and he had mostly good reviews. However, when I met with him when he was close to retirement, he seemed very impatient and almost scary.

    • #33524
      Chuck
      Participant

      Watchful thx per the usual. Yes my experience with yunis was the same. He definitely did not brag or exaggerate his experience. You advised that you would not go to shouldice again. You really did a perfect analysis of your options. For me the cremaster cutting and steel wire stuff scared me off shouldice. Plus at the time they were enforcing the death vax. How did you select your shouldice physician? Did you ask yunis who was best? I am guessing Netto might be the best doc there as he is now chief of surgery. This was one of the most complex decisions I have ever been faced with. If I had to do over again without knowing how toxic mesh is I wonder what I would have done. I hoped to avoid chronic pain by avoiding cutting and tissue trauma. But lap burned me anyway. It’s such a barbaric procedure. Would love to know your do over choice

    • #33538
      Watchful
      Participant

      Chuck,

      Right, I think back then when you were researching it they were indeed cutting the cremaster completely, cutting the genital nerve, and using steel sutures. This changed more recently as I mentioned before.

      I selected the surgeon based on experience and reviews. Hall, Slater, and Simmons have many years of experience performing this procedure, and they get mostly good reviews. Netto is pretty junior actually – he has been doing this for only 3-4 years. The best surgeon there in recent times was Alexander, but he retired during the pandemic. Another great one was Degani, but he is mostly retired now, and really old (in his 80s I believe).

      The place is not what it used to be, unfortunately. Shouldice who used to monitor things closely passed away, and the other big names who kept the strict tradition there retired or passed away. They now diverged in how they do the procedure, there are a number of young part timers there, etc. Also, the property was sold for redevelopment recently, and it’s not clear what will happen to this hospital.

      • #33543
        Andy2023
        Participant

        Watchful,

        you have shared a lot of useful information here, thank you. I am now looking for options for my bilateral hernia and am considering Shouldice. Could you elaborate what you mean “they now diverged in how they do the procedure”? does it look like they are having difficulty recruiting surgeons and hence using part timers?

      • #33557
        Watchful
        Participant

        They used to be very strict about following the original procedure, including cutting the cremaster and genital nerve branch, and using steel sutures. That has changed in recent times.

        Another thing that changed is that they now operate on Saturdays.

        They don’t have enough full-time surgeons for the load, particularly since they lost a few over the last few years. They seem to compensate by some full timers taking on a higher load (such as 4 surgical days a week with 6 surgeries a day), and by using part timers.

        If I had a bilateral, I probably wouldn’t do both sides in one visit – I would space them out. I believe they do it in two surgeries anyway (at least that’s how they used to do it). It’s not something that I thought about since I didn’t have a bilateral, but I don’t think I would want to do two surgeries so close together.

      • #33585
        Andy2023
        Participant

        Thanks Watchful. As this thread is primarily for Yunis, I will follow/comment on your other threads primarily for Shouldice.

    • #33550
      PeterC
      Participant

      Out of everyone I consulted he was the most “down to earth”. Its true that his receptionist is very dry for no reason but I’ve had that experience at multiple clinics. That being said Dr. Yunis seemed very honest with me. One of the only surgeons to have the guts to say that was Dr. Brown did to me was absurd and that he did hurt me while also saying he does not feel like he could really help me in my current situation as opposed to trying to get me into a trivial surgery just to make a few bucks off of me.

      That being said, if 1 person has a bad experience with a surgeon its usually that specific situation/person. Once it starts being 3-4-5+ people all reporting the same thing – there’s usually a real issue there. Where there’s smoke there’s usually fire.

      • #33552
        ajm222
        Participant

        @PeterC – out of curiosity, do you suffer from any pain currently after all this time, or is it mostly just mechanical dysfunction and disability?

      • #33553
        PeterC
        Participant

        Hey @ajm222 – its both at the moment.

        Since having Dr. Brown’s surgery I have serious structural weakness where my core is no longer this one big structure that I should be able to tense up/flex as a whole. In his surgery he cut open the external oblique aponeurosis from the external ring to the level of the internal ring and never closed it. So instead of being 1 big sheet of tissue its now 2 separate parts causing structural failure/weakness of the external oblique and my entire core. This in turn weakens the entire groin area/inguinal ligament and by extension my hip flexors are also loose/weak. It affects the way I walk, my knee stability, and a bunch more. My groin and lower abs feel like mashed potatoes and the rest of my core is visibly weird looking/dysfunctional.

        Pain-wise, I regularly have inguinal ligament pain and inguinal floor pain/soreness/aching/burning almost daily. Especially where he sutured something (so he sutured the conjoint tendon at the shelving portion of the inguinal ligament – I have pain in a straight line there) and he sutured a flap of the external oblique aponeurosis to the inguinal ligament – pain right there. You can tell those tissues do not want to be there and are constantly aching.

        I also have pain that I already had before that nobody has been able to figure out at the insertion of the rectus into the pubic bone which is what I suspect was my original injury all along but I already had this before Dr. Brown. If anything this part hurts less now because the generalized weakness from Dr. Brown’s surgery means the abs are not able to remain tense hence there is less pulling/tension at their insertion.

        I still have no idea what to do this situation is like walking blind in a mine field. I have yet to consult anyone who would be able to give me a real game plan. Hopefully this year I’m able to find something. I thought not having any mesh or anything permanent in me would make it easier to get help but apparently not.

        • This reply was modified 2 days, 2 hours ago by PeterC.
      • #33570
        ajm222
        Participant

        Thanks for the response, Peter. Very interesting. And best of luck getting some answers this year.

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