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  • Lymphocyte

    Posted by Kerryk on April 6, 2016 at 8:31 pm

    6 was post bilateral inguinal repair. Still sore. Ct scan showed a lyphocyte near the repair. Ultrasound tomorrow to check mesh placement. My regular MD didn’t know much about them. Will see surgeon next week. Could it be the reason I have felt awful and had delayed healing.

    sngoldstein replied 8 years, 1 month ago 3 Members · 13 Replies
  • 13 Replies
  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 17, 2016 at 12:26 pm

    Lymphocyte

    I had the hernias repaired to help with low back hip pain… Sadly the pain in my back is off the charts and I am told it has nothing to do with the surgery. Wish I’d left the small hernias alone. Surgical sites are sore and slow to heal. Hoping all will settle down soon. Thanks for the advice.

  • sngoldstein

    Member
    April 17, 2016 at 12:20 am

    Lymphocyte

    I have had patients complain about unusual sensations for several months to years after surgery. The question is, does it affect your life significantly or is it a minor annoyance? Every thing we do has risk and trying to make “good” better, is not always the right thing to do.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 13, 2016 at 2:21 pm

    Lymphocyte

    General question. Can it take a while for the numbness / dull ache etc. to resolve? Seems mostly from incision down on the pubic area. Has been almost 7 weeks.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 11, 2016 at 11:07 am

    Lymphocyte

    Thank you. I am still waiting for my surgeon to get the ultrasound report. Hoping to hear today or tomorrow if it’s the lymphocele or there is an issue with the mesh.

  • sngoldstein

    Member
    April 11, 2016 at 1:10 am

    Lymphocyte

    It’s usually about 6-8 weeks after surgery but it depends on the size. Larger ones take longer. Dr. Towfigh is correct that they can be drained under ultrasound or CT guidance but if it’s behind the mesh I would not recommend that. There is a risk of infection and putting a needle through the mesh is difficult and could risk injuring other structures.

  • drtowfigh

    Moderator
    April 10, 2016 at 6:34 pm

    Lymphocyte

    Some patients are very sensitive and can feel pain from even a small fluid collection. If it doesn’t resolve and you have symptoms, consider aspiration of the fluid. There is a risk of mesh infection, so this procedure should not be taken lightly.

    Exercise will not cause any problems.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 10, 2016 at 12:29 pm

    Lymphocyte

    Dr Goldstein do you mean 6 to 8 weeks post surgery for the seroma to resolve? Or longer than the average recovery time?

  • sngoldstein

    Member
    April 9, 2016 at 10:17 pm

    Lymphocyte

    Yes. Exercise has been shown to be better than medication for relieving pain.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 9, 2016 at 11:18 am

    Lymphocyte

    Thank you. I am hoping that 8 wks is the magic number to start feeling well again. It just pulls and hurts so I have avoided the things I love. Yoga etc. do you continue to exercise through the pain?

  • sngoldstein

    Member
    April 9, 2016 at 12:01 am

    Lymphocyte

    I am not sure if there is a correlation between seroma size and pain. They typically resolve in 6 to 8 weeks. I generally recommend waiting at least 4 months after a hernia operation to intervene for pain unless it is getting worse. It takes over a year for things to fully heal and the inflammation to subside.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 8, 2016 at 6:28 pm

    Lymphocyte

    Ultrasound showed a small seroma under mesh. Can even the little ones cause you grief? And typically how long will it last. Feels like a painfull bubble. Worst at night.

  • Kerryk

    Member
    April 7, 2016 at 12:14 pm

    Lymphocyte

    Thank you for your response. Can the seroma make you feel really un well? This has been a tough recovery. Sad that I get more answers on here than from my own Dr.

  • sngoldstein

    Member
    April 6, 2016 at 11:38 pm

    Lymphocyte

    I think you mean “lymphocele.” That is simply a fluid collection near the mesh. Surgeons usually refer to them as seromas. They are not unusual and will almost always resolve on their own. I have seen them cause significant pain for several weeks, however. Antiinflammatories like ibuprofen are your best bet.

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